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“I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a firefighter The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we who know the work which the firefighter has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

-Chief Edward F. Croker FDNY circa 1910

New law requires a moment of silence in NYS Schools

Lower-Manhattan-WM

New York schools are required to provide a moment of silence to observe the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks, according to a new state law approved by Gov. Andrew Cuomo Monday.

The law calls for a brief moment of silence at the beginning of the school day every 9/11 to encourage dialogue & education in the classroom among a new generation of students who weren’t alive during the 2001 terror attacks that leveled the World Trade Center’s twin towers & killed more than 3,000 people — the worst foreign attack on American soil.

The law goes into effect immediately.

“9/11 was one of the single darkest periods in this state’s & this nation’s history, & we owe it to those we lost & to the countless heroes who ran toward danger that day & the days that followed to do everything we can to keep their memory alive,” Cuomo said.

“By establishing this annual day of remembrance & a brief moment of silence in public schools, we will help ensure we never forget — not just the pain of that moment but of the courage, sacrifice & outpouring of love that defined our response.”“Students graduating from High School as part of the Class of 2019 were just newborns during the terrorists attacks of September 11, 2001, & soon enough there will be no students in the national public school system born at the time of 9/11,” Amato said.

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Baltimore City fire to send less companies to fires due to rise in medical calls

Balto

Starting next month, the Baltimore City Fire will send fewer units to house fires. In an effort to deal with a significant rise in medic calls, the Baltimore City Fire Department is testing a new policy that will initially send fewer trucks & equipment to house fires. The fire union said the new policy will put residents in danger, but the mayor & the department disagree. "It's just a test. I think it's fair that we look at it," Mayor Jack Young said. "I was briefed on that by the chief. This is something that we are going to do based on the limited resources we have." The policy change will be in place for three to four months. The goal is to determine whether the move saves money & stretches resources. Firefighters are also trained as medics & can respond to emergency medical calls. Baltimore Firefighters Union opposes the move, writing in a statement: "This Local is against any changes that will lower the amount of units on an initial response. This not only puts our members in danger, but the citizens of Baltimore." "There is no danger to members or to the public," Baltimore City Fire Department spokesman Chief Roman Clark said. Currently, five engine companies -- short trucks that carry water -- respond to a fire. Two ladder trucks & two battalion chiefs are also sent to a fire scene, as well as a medic unit. Starting Sept. 1st, that contingent will be reduced to three engine companies, one ladder company, a battalion chief & a medic. The battalion chief at the scene will have the authority to call in more units, if necessary. The Philadelphia Fire Department operates this way. "The (National Fire Protection) standard says for a low hazard, you must have at least 15 members on the ground. With the response that we are doing, we will have 17 on the ground. With a high hazard, they ask that you have at least 28 members on the ground. With our high hazard, we will have 30, so we are within the guidelines," Clark said. "I don't think it is a dangerous practice proposal. I think it is something that we really need to look at. You don't want to send all those firetrucks & everything to one occasion that might not need all of that equipment," Young said. The temporary policy change will give officers at the scene more responsibility. They will make the call on whether more units are needed. On Friday, the The Baltimore’s Fire Fighters & Fire Officer unions released a statement opposing the new policy "because it would provide fewer resources to respond," & "It may increase the risk of injury or death to the public and our members." “This new policy leaves fire fighters & available resources sitting in firehouses, delaying their response to an emergency” Stephen Horchar, president of Baltimore’s Fire Officers, said. “Decisions that affect the level of public safety in our city cannot be made in a vacuum,” Dickie Altieri, president of the Baltimore Fire Fighters Association, said. “The people that are potentially affected by these decisions have to be included to ensure that citizens and fire fighters that respond to help them remain safe.”

FDNY Ambulance hit by BB gun

bbgun Spidered windshield in FDNY ambulance hit by BB gun.

An FDNY Ambulance driving by Wavecrest Gardens in Far Rockaway, Battalion 47 area, was hit by BB gun fire that cracked the windshield.

The NYPD believe the perps weren't aiming at the ambulance intentionally. No members were injured & no arrests were made.

This incident happens a week after a brick was thrown at a NYPD marked van in the Bronx. 

 

Fatal house fire in East Elmhurst declared Arson

fatal 23-49 93 Street in East Elmhurst, Queens.

FDNY Bureau of Fire Investigations announced Thursday that the fatal East Elmhurst fire that claimed the lives of 3 people, including a 6-year-old girl & her great-grandfather, & left 2 other members of their family clinging to life, was a work of an arson after "ignitable liquid was used as an accelerant."

Firefighters were called just after 4pm Wednesday to a fire burning in a two-story home on 93rd Street in East Elmhurst, said FDNY Commissioner Daniel Nigro. Responders were at the scene just minutes later & found two people had escaped the flames. They were rushed to the hospital in extremely critical condition, Nigro said.

3 people were still inside the house as the fire raged. Firefighters battled to put out the inferno & located the 3 inside.

A 6-year-old girl was pronounced dead at the scene, said Nigro. She was visiting from the Dominican Republic with her mother & baby brother, a source familiar with the investigation said.

2 adults later died at the hospital, 1 of whom was the girl's 70-year-old grandfather who lived at the house.

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Retired #FDNY Rescue Medic saves man on edge of Outerbridge

Outerbridge

A good samaritan rushed to save the life of a 19-year-old man who attempted to jump from the Outerbridge Crossing on Tuesday, as shocked New Jersey-bound motorists looked on.

A former Staten Islander from Richmond who now lives in Hazlet, N.J., Gary Smiley noticed the young man -- identified as a Tottenville resident -- get out of his car and start to climb over the railing.

“I yelled out to this kid, ‘what the hell are you doing?’ and told him to get over here,” Smiley said.

As the young man put one leg over the bridge’s railing, Smiley said he went into action. A retried FDNY rescue paramedic, he clutched onto the agitated man and stayed with him until Port Authority police arrived.

“He was very distraught and he thought that he had failed at life and we talked before anyone got there,” Smiley said.

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FDNY 9th Battalion welcomes Army SSG David Bellavia

SSG Members with David Bellavia. Photo via @FDNY twitter

Monday July 1st, the #FDNY 9th Battalion companies; Engine 54, Ladder 4, Engine 23, Engine 40 & Ladder 35 along with Chief of Department Sudnik & Manhattan Boro Commander Chief Ajello welcomed Medal of Honor recipient US Army Staff Sergeant David Bellavia for lunch.

The actions for which Bellavia earned a Silver Star took place on his 29th birthday. As a member of Company A, Task Force 2-2, 1st Infantry Division, his platoon was assigned during Operation Phantom Fury to clear a block of twelve buildings from which insurgents were firing on American forces. The platoon began searching house-to-house. At the tenth house, Bellavia fatally shot an insurgent preparing to load a rocket-propelled grenade. A second insurgent fired at him, and Bellavia wounded him in the shoulder. When Staff Sergeant Bellavia entered a bedroom, the wounded insurgent followed, forcing Bellavia to kill him. When another insurgent began firing from upstairs, Bellavia returned fire and killed him. A fourth insurgent then jumped out of a closet in the bedroom, yelling and firing his weapon as he leaped over a bed trying to reach Bellavia. The insurgent tripped and Bellavia wounded him. Bellavia chased the insurgent when he ran upstairs. He followed the wounded insurgent's bloody footprints to a room on the left and threw in a fragmentation grenade. Upon entering the room, Bellavia discovered it was filled with propane tanks and plastic explosives. He did not fire his weapon for fear of setting off an explosion and instead then engaged in hand-to-hand combat with the insurgent, which led to Bellavia killing the insurgent by stabbing him in the collarbone.

The 18th annual Blessing of the Fleet

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The #NYPD, #FDNY & #USCG participated in The Blessing of the FDNY Marine Fleet on Monday July 1st. This maritime tradition is meant to ensure safe travels & bountiful season of the FDNY Marine fleet, which encompasses 28 vessels stationed throughout the five boroughs. Full Time Marine companies are 1, 6, 9 & Marine Battalion. Marine 3, 4 & 8 are Summer Boat program from May through October covering the Summer & Hurricane season.

Man dies after being crushed by safe in Chinatown NYC

Eng55 Engine 55 at Manhattan box 175. 76 Mott Street.

CHINATOWN, Manhattan (WABC) -- A man died after a falling safe crushed him in Manhattan.

Police say they found the man on the third floor landing of a building in Chinatown Sunday afternoon, pinned underneath a safe.

Police believe the man was trying to move the safe up several flights of stairs, when it fell on him.

The FDNY says another person went to the hospital.

Police believe it was an accident.

3 injured when scaffolding blew off roof in Park Slope

Scaffolding Scaffolding collapse in Park Slope. Photo By FDNY

Three people were injured — one seriously — after scaffolding blew off a roof into the courtyard of a bar next door, the FDNY said. 

Construction crews were working on the bulkhead of the roof of a 12-story building on 4th Avenue, near President Street, on the border of Park Slope and Gowanus Sunday afternoon when a gust of wind blew the scaffolding around the bulkhead off the roof, FDNY Deputy Chief James McNally said. 

The scaffolding flew into the courtyard of a two-story bar next door, injuring three patrons, McNally said. 

Why are the stars of the flag foward?

Flags

Army Regulation 670-1, “Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia,” updated most recently September 5, 2003, addresses explicitly the proper and lawful placement of the U.S. flag patch on the Army uniform.

The regulation states that when authorized for application to the proper uniform the American flag patch is to be worn, right or left shoulder, so that “the star field faces forward, or to the flag’s own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer’s right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward. The appropriate replica for the right shoulder sleeve is identified as the ‘reverse side flag’.”

This would give the vision of the flag being led into battle, not retreating, or moving forward.

Window washer fatally injured on scaffolding in Midtown East

Scaffolding

 A window washer is dead after being hit on the head with a brick in Manhattan, according to police.

The incident happened at 311 East 50th Street between Second and First avenues around 12:15 p.m., FDNY officials said.

The worker, later identified as 51-year-old Nelson Salinas, was on suspended scaffolding with one other person, officials said. The other person on the scaffolding was not hit or injured.

"I feel so sad. It's already dangerous, the construction job," said Jenny Chen, who worked at a store across the street from the incident.

"I heard some noise and screaming. I went outside and just see the one guy laying down where they are working,"  said Jimmy Kant, who also works nearby.

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FDNY Firefighter among 4 Marines killed in Afghanistan

Slutman

A decorated FDNY firefighter was among four Americans killed by a roadside bomb near the main U.S. base in Afghanistan on Monday, sources told The Post.

Christopher Slutman, a married father of three, worked at Ladder 27 in the Claremont section of the Bronx, the sources said.

Slutman, who was a 15-year veteran of the FDNY, also served as a U.S. Marine, according to sources.

One source remembered him as a devoted father and hard-working FDNY member.

“He was really a great guy,” the source said. “He loved being a fireman, and he was a real family man.”

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Pheonix fire involved in fatal accident

PHX

Pheonix Fire involved in a fatal motorvehicle accident at 29th Ave & Bethany Home Road.

This story is still developing. 2 firefighters were transported to area hospital in critical condition. 1 civlian was pronounced dead at the scene, 2 other civilians, the local news are reporting have been pronounced dead at the hospital, 1 is a 3 month old.

The apparatus left the road, stopping on it's side.

Our New York City hearts are with all involved in this accident.

Defib saves the life of a firefighter who requested to have them installed just months before

Staut2 FF Bill Staudt.

Well all know that firefighters are trained to save lives — sometimes it’s each others’, but sometimes it can be their own.

A longtime member of the FDNY may have been saved simply by asking that his building be equipped with a defibrillator.

For 36 years, Bill Staudt made a career of stepping into harm’s way.

“I’m a firefighter, proud to be a firefighter,” he told CBS2.

Never in a million years did he imagine it would be him who had to be saved on the job. That day came on a Thursday last September at an FDNY research and development building in Queens.

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Career criminal who killed FDNY EMT fit to stand trial

gonzalez

The career criminal charged with fatally running over a beloved FDNY*EMS EMT with her own ambulance is mentally fit to stand trial, a psychiatrist hired by the Bronx district attorney’s office testified Thursday.

Jose Gonzalez, 25, told the psychiatrist that the prosecutors seeking to lock him up for life are “evil people,” explained Dr. Nicole Charder, who also works for the state’s Office of Mental Health.

Gonzalez is charged with murder, manslaughter and robbery for his deadly encounter with EMT Yadira Arroyo on March 16, 2017.

In jail he has made several phone calls that show “he could be feigning or exaggerating some of his psychiatric symptoms,” said assistant district attorney George Suminski.

“I can get by & I can go to the hospital & I can beat the case,” he said in one recorded phone call.

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FDNY's Bravest makes supreme sacrifice

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When Ladder Co. 170 arrived at the scene of a car crash on the Belt Parkway Sunday night, the firefighters immediately ran toward the crumpled remains of an SUV on the opposite side.

As the FDNY’s Bravest crossed over a pair of Jersey barriers separated by a 3-foot gap, the unthinkable happened.

“I just heard, ‘Oh, my God! Oh, my God! A firefighter fell, he fell through, he fell through,’ ” car-crash victim Travis Simms .

Firefighter Steven Pollard, 30, fell through the space dividing the eastbound and westbound lanes on the parkway’s overpass bridge and plummeted 52 feet to the ground.

He died a short time later at Kings County Hospital.

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NYS Smoke detector law going into effect

smoke-detector

Homeowners & landlords will soon need to swap out their smoke detectors for upgraded 10-year sealed models, thanks to a new New York State law going into effect this year.

The law says that starting April 1, 2019 all new or replacement smoke detectors in New York State must be powered by a 10-year, sealed, non-removable battery or hardwired to the home.

Homeowners & landlords must upgrade their smoke detectors before selling or renting homes and apartments in New York State.

The upgraded smoke detector alarms include a sealed lithium battery with a 10-year lifespan.

While these 10-year smoke detectors have a larger upfront cost than traditional alarms powered by replaceable batteries, the lack of yearly battery changes makes them cheaper over the life of the device.

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Street alarm box, still working, still trusted

Fire-box

It is being reported that Boston Fire Dept responded to a working fire at 5:15a at Endicott Street in the North End, this response was initiated by Box Alarm Readout System (BARS). The media is refering to this system as 'antiquated', however, this morning there was widespread 911 outages in the Boston area. While it may appear to be antiquated, once again, the tried & true independant system has proven it's worth in the Fire Service as firefighters arrived to heavy smoke pouring out of the building.

Every so often, the battle to keep the boxes comes up in New York City. For the mechanical boxes, when you pull it, it sends the box number to the Boro central office. Based on the box number, the specific assignment responds. Yes, they do not know what they are going to, but they are going. These boxes are independently powered at each boro central office. With the ERS boxes, you can push NYPD(blue button) or FDNY(red button) & verbally speak with the dispatcher to report the incident.

Yes, these days, everyone has a cell phone, but as proven this morning in Boston, modern technology doesn't always work. In addition- 911, Fire & EMS dispatchers are overworked across the country.

Related links:

Boston sporatic 911 outage 12/28/18 https://www.boston25news.com/news/911-outage-impacting-massachusetts-here-s-how-to-call-for-help/895421967

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Patches for Evan

Potter

Philly Fire Engine 33 is helping the 10-year-old remember his father & honor his legacy with a unique collection effort.

These Christmas ornaments are precious indeed, but nowhere near as irreplaceable as the face that they frame.

“It’s been weird not having him around,” said Evan Potter.

Evan’s father, Michael, died suddenly in January of 2016. He was a marine corps veteran & a proud Philadelphia firefighter.

For the holidays this year, Evan's wish is simple, to fill up his board of fire company patches, to collect them just like his dad did.

“If we would go on vacation somewhere, he [Michael] always visited the fire station and got a patch or a tee shirt & he gave one from Philly,” said Amanda Potter, Evan’s mother.

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High levels of toxic mercury found in home of suspected poison victims: FDNY

Mercury

The Queens air-conditioning-company owner accused of trying to poison a family with mercury loaded so much of the toxic metal into their AC unit that levels in the air soared to more than 60 times the regulated standards, an FDNY lieutenant testified Wednesday.

Lt. John Cassidy of the FDNY’s HAZMAT unit testified in Queens Criminal Court Wednesday that when he tested the air inside the Jamaica Estates home in 2015, he found mercury levels to be over 60 micrograms-per-meter-cubed in every room in the house.

The Centers for Disease Control has advised that anything over one microgram-per-meter cubed is unsafe.

After finding “multiple small beads” of mercury inside the unit’s intake vent, Cassidy advised the family to stay away from the house until the Department of Health gave them clearance to return.

Yuriy Kruk, the owner of A+ HVAC and Kitchen Corporation, installed the new AC unit inside Roman Pinkhasov’s elegant Jamaica Estates home in July 2015. Soon after, the homeowner and his family came down with a mysterious illness.

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